Increased fines for texting while driving in 2020

Last updated: 12-24-2019

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Increased fines for texting while driving in 2020

Queensland drivers illegally using mobile devices behind the wheel will be targeted with the toughest penalties in Australia to increase road safety. Under new laws in place pm February 1, 2020 drivers caught on their devices will be fined $1000 and demerit points increase from 3 to 4. If drivers are caught a second time within 12 months, double demerit points apply and they could lose their licence. Transport and Main Roads Minister Mark Bailey said the tough penalties were necessary to get the life-saving road safety message through. "Queensland now has the toughest penalties for distracted driving in Australia," Mr Bailey said. "Drivers using their phones illegally behind the wheel will pay a high price, but that penalty falls well short of the costs and trauma our community carries for those killed or injured in crashes caused by inattentive drivers. "A driver's response time while texting is comparable to that of a driver with a blood alcohol reading of between 0.07 and 0.10. "Like drink driving, drivers need to know that reaching for the phone to send a quick text or check social media when their eyes should be on the road is unacceptable." Mr Bailey said it was a deadly habit that needed to stop. "We're getting close to that time of year when we start to have Christmas parties and take holidays where driving long distances might be involved," he said. "Put the phone in the glovebox or set it to Do Not Disturb so you're not distracted by it." During 2018, 33 people died on Queensland roads because of crashes involving distracted or inattentive drivers or riders. Over the same period, 1358 people were hospitalised in crashes caused by distracted driving. Due to difficulties investigators face in determining distraction as the cause of a crash, road safety researchers believe the true number of people being killed or injured in crashes caused by mobile phone use is under-reported.


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