Whitehorse Daily Star: Enforcement measures find many infractions

Whitehorse Daily Star: Enforcement measures find many infractions

ENFORCING TRAFFIC LAWS – This motorcycle was pulled over on the North Klondike Highway during this month’s traffic enforcement initiative. Its speed had been clocked at 171 kilometres per hour. Photo courtesy RCMP

Between May 4 and 7, Yukon RCMP Traffic Services and the territorial Department of Highways and Public Works – Carrier Compliance and National Safety Code conducted Operation Corridor across north-central Yukon. By Whitehorse Star on May 17, 2021

Between May 4 and 7, Yukon RCMP Traffic Services and the territorial Department of Highways and Public Works – Carrier Compliance and National Safety Code conducted Operation Corridor across north-central Yukon.

This operation was focused on commercial vehicle compliance enforcement, police said last Thursday from Dawson City.

Officers travelled 3,800 kilometres over the four-day span with enforcement activities in all the communities along the North Klondike and Silver Trail Highways.

Operation Corridor enforcement was requested after significant community engagement and enforcement of the 75-per-cent spring weight restriction.

This enforcement was scheduled to align with the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance International Road Check Week.

“We performed over 50 Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) road checks during a blitz held in tandem with Operation Corridor this year,” said Sebastien Nadeau from the Yukon government’s National Safety Code and Carrier Compliance.

“The average violation rate was 40 per cent. Carrier compliance teams were active in Watson Lake, Whitehorse, Mayo and Dawson City.

“Our goal is always to ensure safety of the travelling public and protection of our critical infrastructure,” Nadeau added.

“Enforcing vehicle safety issues and weights on commercial vehicles during spring weight restrictions help us further that goal.”

This annual campaign is conducted by agencies that are part of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance in Canada, the United States and Mexico.

Officers check vehicles and drivers for compliance with federal and provincial/territorial regulations.

During this enforcement. the following violations were found:

• eight CVSA out of services, which takes either a vehicle or driver out of service;

• two charges under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations; and

There were also two suspended drivers, one in a private vehicle, the other driving a tractor-trailer with a loaded flat deck trailer.

The tractor unit was impounded. The suspended driver did not have a valid log book nor safety inspection, in addition to insecure cargo.

A large service truck was stopped for speeding, and it was found to be unregistered and uninsured.

The driver did not have log book or other required documentation. The truck escorted to Carmacks, where arrangements were made for impoundment.

A tractor-trailer was stopped on the Silver Trail Highway. The driver had forged log books, and was dangerously fatigued.

The truck was parked at Stewart Crossing and the driver was placed out of service for seven hours.

There were two separate incidents of tractor-trailers being over-dimensional and without the required signage and pilot cars.

There were five charges for blatant cargo securement violations.

There have been eight Operation Corridor patrols conducted over the past six months.

These patrols have been targeted enforcement in all road-accessible communities across the territory. To date, Operation Corridor has yielded the following results:

• seven 24-hour driving suspensions for alcohol or drugs; and

The team conducting Operation Corridor meets many commercial and public drivers during the performance of their duties.

Many checks have been positive and the drivers have been professional and knowledgeable about compliance to regulations and their role keeping the roads safe.

“It’s important for all road users to feel that vehicles, both industry and non-industry, are being operated in a safe manner,” said Cpl. Natasha Dunmall of Yukon RCMP Traffic Services.

“This northern blitz covered a lot of area, and while the officers did find violations they also found vehicles that were completely compliant.

“Equally, private vehicles were also stopped; just because a vehicle is privately registered doesn’t mean the enforcement teams turn the proverbal blind eye; in fact, 105 of the 248 charges were against privately registered vehicles.”

There were several notable events throughout the operations that caught the attention of the enforcement team and which underscore the requirement for this type of enforcement.

For example, a driver impaired by cannabis had 20 grams of cannabis located beside him. A cannabis seizure made and enforcement taken under the CCRA. He was subsequently issued a 24-hour roadside suspension.

A commercial tractor-trailer driver was issued a careless driving charge after hitting high speeds on the Alaska Highway area that goes through Haines Junction.

A dump truck was stopped in the Ibex Valley.

It was found the driver only held a class 5 licence and reported that he had been operating the dump truck for the last six months.

The driver was towing a Bobcat that was not secured properly to the trailer.

The trailer was discovered to have been reported stolen from a commercial contracting yard in Whitehorse in 2018.

The driver was charged with possession of stolen property under the Criminal Code, along with three territorial charges.

The trailer was seized and later collected by the insurance company.

A commercial driver operating a B-Train was arrested for impaired driving after he was observed by police to be visibly impaired by cannabis.

A blood demand was made, and samples were taken. The truck was impounded and the driver was given a direct court appearance for not being able to provide 14 days of logs for the second time in two months

A commercial tractor-trailer stopped and the driver given a careless driving charge, after nearly running a vehicle off the road just north of Jakes Corner.

A commercial driver operating a B-Train was observed by police to be visibly impaired by cannabis, and was arrested for the drug-impaired operation of a vehicle.

A blood demand was made, and samples were taken. The truck was impounded and the driver was given a direct court appearance, charged with operating a conveyance while impaired and for violations under Federal Hours of Service legislation.

A commercial vehicle stopped and the driver given a careless driving charge, encompassing speeding, and unsafe and prohibited passing.

A commercial vehicle stopped and the driver charged with driving at unsafe speeds.

After a commercial tractor trailer was stopped, two out of services were issued for possession of alcohol to two drivers.

One driver had poured whiskey into four soda bottles and had them lined up as “road pops”. They were seized and tickets were issued.

Two commercial tractor trailers were found with expired safety inspections and with deficiencies that posed risks to public safety.

Operation Corridor events occur periodically throughout the year with the overall intent to promote awareness of the rules and regulations of commercial transportation, identify common occurrences, and promote improved road safety for all people who travel Yukon highways and roadways.

“Yukon is a large, diverse geographic area with an equally diverse variety of commercial vehicles,” said Insp. Rob Nason, district commander of the Yukon RCMP.

“Commercial vehicles have the potential to cause significant damage and harm when they are not up to safety standards.

“Collaborating with Yukon Government allows us to use expertise from each agency as a team to improve the safety in our communities and on our vast stretches of highways,” Nason added.

“This is an excellent example of what we do together to improve safety.”